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History of the parish

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Early history

Located in East Staffordshire, Hoar Cross nestles in the hills of the ancient Needwood Forest, now part of the National Forest. The name of the village was first recorded in 1230 a.d., and appeared as Horcros. It is thought to refer to grey cross or boundary cross.

Hoar Cross formed its own Ecclesiastical Parish in 1874.

Hoar Cross Hall 1950
Hoar Cross Hall 1950
Hoar Cross Hall which is situated approximately 3/4 mile from the village centre once belonged to the Talbots, Earls of Shrewsbury, but passed to the Meynell family who rebuilt it between 1862 and 1871.
Henry John Chetwynd-Talbot, 18th Earl of Shrewsbury
Henry John Chetwynd-Talbot, 18th Earl of Shrewsbury

 

 

 

 

 

 

Designed by Henry Cluton the Hall was constructed in the Jacobean style of Temple Newsam, the seat of the Ingram family near Leeds. In 1782, Hugo Meynell married Elizabeth Ingram Shepherd, and their son took the name Hugo Charles Meynell-Ingram.

Emily Charlotte Meynell-Ingram
Emily Charlotte Meynell-Ingram

In 1863, their grandson married Emily Charlotte Wood, eldest daughter of Sir Charles Wood, 1st Vicount Halifax. They were responsible for the reconstruction of the Hall.

The last Meynell to reside at Hoar Cross Hall was Colonel Hugo Meynell.
Hugo Francis Meynell-Ingram
Hugo Francis Meynell-Ingram
He moved to nearby Newborough in 1952 after which the building stood empty for a number of years. It was acquired by the Bickerton Jones family in 1970, who restored much of the building.